News

Zhang lands DOD breast cancer research award

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Siyuan Zhang

Siyuan Zhang, the Dee Associate Professor of Biological Sciences who is also affiliated with the Harper Cancer Research Institute, landed a nearly $1.1 million Breast Cancer Research Program Breakthrough Award through the Department of Defense in August.

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Notre Dame global health leaders attend American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Eck Institute for Global Health

From Saturday, October 28 through Thursday, November 1, members of the University of Notre Dame research community will travel to New Orleans, LA for the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) meeting. Of the over 40 Notre Dame faculty, researchers, and students in attendance, many will be presenting their research through lectures, presentations, and posters. 

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Summer undergraduate research meaningful for several who conducted work on campus

Author: Alexandra Park

Summer Undergraduate Research

Several undergraduate students from the University of Notre Dame's College of Science spent their summers on campus conducting research on topics including medicine, ecology, physics and mathematics. Their enthusiasm and dedication toward their projects embodied the spirit of using scholarship and creative endeavor to advance scientific understanding of the world.

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New study reveals surprising effects of mutations in proteins

Author: Teresa L. Johnson

Jeffrey Peng

Predicting how mutations in proteins alter their ability to function is critical to understanding what drives health and disease in humans. A new study in Structure, Cell Press by scientists at the University of Notre Dame and their colleagues demonstrates how a minor mutation can have far-reaching effects on a protein, playing a role in the onset of different diseases.

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Study uncovers new hurdle for developing immunotherapies

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Brian Baker

The body’s immune system is a valiant weapon against disease, and harnessing its power through a technique called immunotherapy is at the forefront of current research to treat cancer and other diseases.That’s why an unexpected finding by University of Notre Dame researchers and their collaborators, related to the way two distinctively different peptide antigens react with one T-cell receptor (TCR), tosses a new wrench into the process of building better molecules to develop immunotherapies.

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