News

Summer undergraduate research meaningful for several who conducted work on campus

Author: Alexandra Park

Summer Undergraduate Research

Several undergraduate students from the University of Notre Dame's College of Science spent their summers on campus conducting research on topics including medicine, ecology, physics and mathematics. Their enthusiasm and dedication toward their projects embodied the spirit of using scholarship and creative endeavor to advance scientific understanding of the world.

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New study reveals surprising effects of mutations in proteins

Author: Teresa L. Johnson

Jeffrey Peng

Predicting how mutations in proteins alter their ability to function is critical to understanding what drives health and disease in humans. A new study in Structure, Cell Press by scientists at the University of Notre Dame and their colleagues demonstrates how a minor mutation can have far-reaching effects on a protein, playing a role in the onset of different diseases.

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Study uncovers new hurdle for developing immunotherapies

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Brian Baker

The body’s immune system is a valiant weapon against disease, and harnessing its power through a technique called immunotherapy is at the forefront of current research to treat cancer and other diseases.That’s why an unexpected finding by University of Notre Dame researchers and their collaborators, related to the way two distinctively different peptide antigens react with one T-cell receptor (TCR), tosses a new wrench into the process of building better molecules to develop immunotherapies.

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University of Notre Dame to host Indiana CTSI retreat

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Mccourtney

Indiana University, Purdue University, and the University of Notre Dame invite all researchers to attend the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI) retreat. The event will take place at the University of Notre Dame’s McCourtney Hall on Friday, October 26, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

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Science-business softball player helps raise funds for cancer patients

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Berionts 250

When senior science-business major Katie Beriont signed on to play Division I softball for the University of Notre Dame, she never thought her effort on the field would make an impact on the lives of cancer patients and their families. Now in her final season, Beriont has taken a role in organizing the team’s 8th annual Strikeout Cancer event.

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Enzyme in bacteria initiates repair of cell walls damaged by antibiotics

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Shahriar Mobashery

Beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin, are one of the most widely used class of antibiotics in the world. Though they’ve been in use since the 1940s, scientists still don’t fully understand what happens when this class of drugs encounters bacteria. Now, researchers at the University of Notre Dame have elucidated how an enzyme helps bacteria rebound from damage inflicted by antibiotics not strong enough to immediately kill the bacteria on contact.

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Biological Sciences graduate student selected to attend National Graduate Student Symposium at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Zach Schafer Mark Hawk 250

Every spring, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital hosts the National Graduate Student Symposium (NGSS). The Symposium is held for the nation’s top Ph.D. students to present their work and learn more about St. Jude’s advanced research and facilities, which is located in Memphis, Tenn. This year, among more than 1500 applicants who had to be invited to apply, only 41 were selected. Notre Dame biology graduate student Mark Hawk is among this year’s attendees.

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Natural bacterial proteins may prove viable alternatives to antibiotics

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Fields 250

Tiny proteins found in the genomes of some types of bacteria are effective weapons against a wide range of other bacteria, opening the door for the development of new therapies in the age of antibiotic resistance, according to new research at the University of Notre Dame.

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Women’s basketball walk-on aspires to be orthopedic surgeon

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Kaitlin Cole 250

Kaitlin Cole, like many other sophomores in the College of Science, intends to go to medical school after graduation. She also has dreams of becoming an orthopedic surgeon. Unlike many other aspiring doctors, however, Cole has a rigorous athletics schedule — as a member of the Notre Dame women’s top-five NCAA basketball team.

 

 

 

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Biophysicist Patricia Clark awarded $1.1M Keck grant for protein folding study

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Patricia Clark 250

Patricia Clark, Rev. John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, has been awarded a $1.1 million, four-year grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to develop an innovative approach to replicate in test tubes a universal component of protein folding within cells.

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